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spoke to my supplier yesterday, to try and arrange another delivery (should be here sometime on Monday)..but !..he has no more figs , elephant bush or the larger Japanese hollies.So, I,ve no more big hollies,but still have 3 sizes of fig, and some broom style elephant bush...as well as the chinese elms.If any of these are on your bucket list, get in quick ! as I don,t know how long they will stay in the shop !! Also note that the shop will close at 4pm on 24th Dec,and re-open when my new lights have been installed,and a fresh lot of trees delivered....when that will be,well,your guess would be as good as mine.I will be around though, so if you need to contact me,either email or phone, and I,ll contact you as soon as I get the message. ... See MoreSee Less

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thank you Jason Earl ... See MoreSee Less

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thank you Arshaad Sibda ... See MoreSee Less

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thank you Carey Davis-Munro ... See MoreSee Less

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Bonsai Ko shared Bonsai4me.com's post. ... See MoreSee Less

This should interest anyone who collects yamadori or have freshly repotted trees in a new substrate. We are all aware of the benefits of a healthy micro-climate within Bonsai soil, and the importance of mycelium on the roots and the health of a tree. A few weeks ago I had the pleasure of a visit from Pascal Gradt who told me about how adding a layer of chopped hemp straw on the soil surface greatly increased the level of mycelium in the soil (and along with it, prolific surface roots). Sold on the idea, I applied a layer of hemp straw (a bale costs around £5 from pet shops) onto the surface of my newly collected trees. (See first image). This morning I was shocked to see the soil surface of one tree, where I had then covered the hemp straw with a layer of inorganic soil, covered in a very fine layer of mycelium, just two weeks after application! This is something I’ve just never seen before. I don’t think the layer of soil over the hemp straw has made any difference, it has simply made the mycelium visible. Having seen the rapid effect of this stuff with my own eyes I think it’s right to put it out there for others to try out for themselves. Whether it will ultimately increase the survival rate or rooting of newly collected yamadori, is still theoretical, for me, but the prescience of so much mycelium can only be a positive thing. The only other caveat I’ll add here is that I’m using an unheated polytunnel which is slightly warmer and more humid than outside, and I applied Cannazym to the soil. But these two factors on their own have never produced these results before.

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Ru Garvey ... See MoreSee Less

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preview and tech run through ... See MoreSee Less

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now todays tantalising teaser is a group of three,and something I,ve never sold in the shop before.......... ... See MoreSee Less

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here is a selection of some of the trees that arrived on Thursday,got them all sorted by 6pm last night.This year I,m doing something a little different,I,ve decided to concentrate on only four species...the ficus retusa (tropical fig) for warm ,light / shady positions, portulacaria afra (elephant bush/jade tree) which thrives in very hot ,bright conditions.,ulmus parvifolia (chinese elm) for cold light conditions and lastly , the ilex crenata (japanese holly) ideal for a cool shady spot.I,m hoping that this might help cut down the confusion when people are choosing the right tree for the location it is being bought for....right then, stand by...... ... See MoreSee Less

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